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Participatory Grantmaking: I’m in! Now what?

sgEngage

You’ve read about participatory grantmaking—and maybe even heard about other organizations using this model to distribute control of their funding strategy and grants decisions to the communities they serve. Choosing Your Participatory Grantmaking Champion.

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This is What the Participatory Museum Sounds Like

Museum 2.0

This is the participatory museum, played out loud. creative placemaking Museum of Art and History participatory museum usercontent visitorsIt's late in the afternoon. I'm cranking away on a grant proposal, when suddenly, a classical rendition of "All the Single Ladies" wafts up the stairs. In the office, colleagues lift their heads. "Is Is that.?" someone asks. Yup," another nods. We grin. This is the magic a piano in the lobby makes.

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Adventures in Participatory Audience Engagement at the Henry Art Gallery

Museum 2.0

In 2009 , students built a participatory exhibit from scratch. Thirteen students produced three projects that layered participatory activities onto an exhibition of artwork from the permanent collection of the Henry Art Gallery. The guiding principle is uncovering relationships between the works of art themselves rather than explicating information or theoretical concepts. Projects participatory museum

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17 Ways We Made our Exhibition Participatory

Museum 2.0

It made me think in ways that I haven't before about the relation of art--as expressive culture--to democracy. Helene Moglen, professor of literature, UCSC After a year of tinkering, the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History is now showing an exhibition, All You Need is Love , that embodies our new direction as an institution. It is multi-disciplinary, incorporates diverse voices from our community, and provides interactive and participatory opportunities for visitor involvement.

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Getting in on the Act: New Report on Participatory Arts Engagement

Museum 2.0

Last month, the Irvine Foundation put out a new report, Getting In On the Act , about participatory arts practice and new frameworks for audience engagement. Authors Alan Brown and Jennifer Novak-Leonard pack a lot into 40 pages--an argument for the rise of active arts engagement, a framework for thinking about ways to actively involve audiences, and lots of case studies. Excellent case studies, especially from the performing arts sector.

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The Participatory Museum, Five Years Later

Museum 2.0

This week marks five years since the book The Participatory Museum was first released. I wrote The Participatory Museum for two reasons: to explore the "how" of participatory design in museums, cultural centers, libraries, and science centers to create a version of this blog that was more "shareable" with organizational leaders and trustees By many measures, the book has been a success. I''m curious to know: has The Participatory Museum played a role in your work?

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Adventures in Evaluating Participatory Exhibits: An In-Depth Look at the Memory Jar Project

Museum 2.0

Two years ago, we mounted one of our most successful participatory exhibits ever at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History: Memory Jars. Two years later, this project is still one of the most fondly remembered participatory experiences at the museum--by visitors and staff. We keep trying to find ways to assign numbers to different kinds of participatory projects at the MAH. What approaches have you used or considered for evaluating participatory projects?

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12 Ways We Made our Santa Cruz Collects Exhibition Participatory

Museum 2.0

In the spirit of a popular post written earlier this year , I want to share the behind the scenes on our current almost-museumwide exhibition at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, Santa Cruz Collects. This exhibition represents a few big shifts for us: We used a more participatory design process. Our previous big exhibition, All You Need is Love, was highly participatory for visitors but minimally participatory in the development process.

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Participatory Moment of Zen: Diverse Visitor Contributions Add Up to Empathy

Museum 2.0

This person is writing about a participatory element (the "pastport") that we included in the exhibition Crossing Cultures. Response mail art after the visit. design exhibition Museum of Art and History participatory museum usercontent Whoever wrote this comment card: thank you. You made my month.

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Put Down the Clipboard:Visitor Feedback as Participatory Activity

Museum 2.0

This past Friday, we experimented with a new feedback format at an evening event focused on poetry and book arts. Museum of Art and History marketing participatory museum usercontentA few weeks ago, the MAH Director of Community Programs, Stacey Garcia, came to me with an idea. Stacey has been collaborating with local artists to produce a series of content-rich events that invite visitors to participate in a range of hands-on activities.

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Balancing Engagement: Adventures in Participatory Exhibit Labels

Museum 2.0

We decided to approach the label-writing for these boards in a participatory way. note: originally, this said "we're writing a label" but with that phrasing, lots of people wrote creative titles for the surfboards (like the title for a work of art) instead of talking about content of interest. If museums are truly about inquiry-based models for learning, we need more tools—especially in history and art museums—to promote inquiry-based engagement.

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Our Museum: Extraordinary Resources on How Museums and Galleries Become Participatory Places

Museum 2.0

Most participatory projects were short-term, siloed innovations, not institutional transformations. Interestingly--for good and ill--this transformative funding program coincided with a national funding crisis in the arts in the UK. While that was painful for the organizations involved, it also helped force the issue of whether participatory engagement could be core to a strong future business model for each organization or not.

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The ongoing revolution in philanthropy: An open-ended reading list

Deborah Elizabeth Finn

Deciding Together Shifting Power and Resources Through Participatory Grantmaking. Empowering Communities: Participatory Grantmakers Say We Must Go beyond Feedback. Community-based participatory research.

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Participatory Internships in Santa Cruz this School Year

Museum 2.0

At the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, we take our interns seriously, give them real responsibility, creative challenges, and meaningful work opportunities. I'm particularly excited about two internships that relate to participatory exhibition design. First, there is the Participatory Exhibit Design Internship. These interns work with our curatorial team to develop interactive and participatory components for upcoming exhibitions.

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Foot in the Door: A Powerful Participatory Exhibit

Museum 2.0

I spent last week working with staff at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA) on ways to make this encyclopedic art museum more open to visitor participation across programs, exhibitions, and events. While there, I was lucky to get to experience a highly participatory exhibition that the MIA mounts once a decade: Foot in the Door. This promoted lots of social object behavior, including lots of pointing at art.

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Fundraising as Participatory Practice: Myths, Realities, Possibilities

Museum 2.0

As a designer, I'm always trying to ensure that participatory activities, however casual, impact both the participant and the organization. If fundraisers are so keen on relationships, why weren't they the first into social media and participatory projects on behalf of their organizations? Interestingly, in the participatory design model I'm more familiar with on the Web and in collaborative project design, the fundamental issues are different.

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Voting on Art and its Surprising Consequences

Museum 2.0

What happens when you let visitors vote on art? Let's look at the statistics from three big participatory projects that wrapped up recently. Each of these invited members of the public to vote on art in a way that had substantive consequences--big cash prizes awarded, prestige granted, exhibitions offered. In each of these examples, the press and public dialogue mostly revolved around the idea of public voting for art.

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Ancient Greece 2.0: Arts Participation before the Industrial Age

Museum 2.0

When we talk about making museums or performing arts organizations more participatory and dynamic, those changes are often seen as threatening to the traditional arts experience. Audience commentary, comfortable spaces for eating and talking, opportunities for amateurs to contribute to professional work: these are often considered intrusions into formal, classical settings for enjoyment of arts. But what if the "traditional" arts experiences is a myth?

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The Art of Relevance is Now Available For Free on the Web (and Here's Why)

Museum 2.0

You can now read all the chapters in The Art of Relevance for free online. You can still buy The Art of Relevance as a paperback, ebook, or audiobook--but you can also read any chapter, any time, online. When I wrote my first book, The Participatory Museum , I released it concurrently as a paperback and free online. I didn't have the time to do a concurrent release for The Art of Relevance because of the Abbott Square project , but I'm catching up now.

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Book Announcement: The Participatory Museum is now available!

Museum 2.0

As many of you know, I've been working for the past year+ on a book about visitor participation in museums, libraries, science centers, and art galleries. The Participatory Museum is a practical guide to visitor participation. The Participatory Museum is an attempt at providing such a resource. I hope it opens up a broader conversation about the nuts and bolts of successful participatory projects. Tags: participatory museum Quick Hits Hey kid!

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ASKing about Art at the Brooklyn Museum: Interview with Shelley Bernstein and Sara Devine

Museum 2.0

The pilots showed us visitors were looking for a personal connection with our staff, wanted to talk about the art on view, and wanted that dialogue to be dynamic and speak to their needs directly. Our visitors were telling us they wanted personal connection and they wanted to talk about art. Goal 2: Looking closer at works of art. We’d like to see visitors getting the information they need while looking more closely at works of art.

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Personal Stories – Arts Orgs Need Not Apply?

Connection Cafe

Working with arts organizations there are often concern that your constituent stories aren’t as impactful. million likes surely someone touting the effect of music and art on their lives can get just as many. If a mother or counselor calls you to express gratitude for that after school program, that summer art camp that kept her child off the streets or the guitar class in the gym on Saturdays, dig in. Annual Fund Fundraising Arts & Cultural museum

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What Happens When a Viral Participatory Project is Too Successful? Diagnosing the Power of the Love Locks

Museum 2.0

Last week, the international press lit up with a story from Paris : the city is removing the "love locks" from the Pont des Arts bridge. And so, one of the most successful, accidental, and fraught participatory projects of the past decade comes to an end. No one planned the love locks, but their success is rooted in the same principles that make all the best participatory projects work: it requires no instructions beyond its own example.

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What a Difference a Prompt Makes. Simple Analysis of a Participatory Exhibit Element

Museum 2.0

We decided to show a selection of Danny's lists in a hallway surrounded by a participatory element where we invite visitors to contribute to new lists on evocative themes ("Things we forget," "The best feelings in the world," etc.) Museum of Art and History design usercontent interactivesI am fascinated by the incredible differences in what people contribute based on format and phrasing of the invitation to participate.

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The Art of Gathering: A Fabulous Book to Help You Host Better Meetings and Events

Museum 2.0

Priya Parker's wonderful book The Art of Gathering shares the core principles of how to drive. Here are my three big takeaways from The Art of Gathering : Hosting is an exercise in courageous leadership. The Art of Gathering expanded my understanding of what it means to build a powerful culture of participation. design participatory museum programsI remember the first staff meeting I ever ran. I had just started at the MAH as the new executive director.

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Goodbye Consulting, Hello Museum of Art & History!

Museum 2.0

As of May 2, I will be the executive director of the Museum of Art & History at McPherson Center in Santa Cruz, CA (here's the press release ). Because of the increased workload I expect in the months to come, as well as the likely possibility that we will start a Museum of Art & History blog, I'm lowering my Museum 2.0 The best way I can really push my own participatory practice and thinking is to operate an institution and work with a community I care about over time.

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The Art of Facilitating Virtual Meetings with Sticky Notes

Beth Kanter

Here’s what I learned about facilitating online meetings with sticky notes and incorporating standing/walking into video meetings: This diagram is one that Andrea adapted from Sam Kaner’s book, Facilitator’s Guide to Participatory Decision-Making that gives you the anatomy for a productive meeting – whether it is face-to-face or virtual. Designing A Participatory Hook for a Virtual Meeting.

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The Participatory Museum Process Part 2: Participants' Experiences

Museum 2.0

This is the second in a four-part series about writing The Participatory Museum. Several hundred people contributed their opinions, stories, suggestions, and edits to The Participatory Museum as it was written. Participants included museum professionals, academics, students, and a few folks from related fields (community centers, arts management). Several said things like, "I was curious to see how this kind of participatory, collaborative approach would work in practice."

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Participatory Design Vs. Design for Participation: Exploring the Difference

Museum 2.0

Which of these descriptions exemplifies participatory museum practice? But the difference between the two examples teases out a problem in differentiating "participatory design" from "design for participation." In the first case, you are making the design process participatory. In the second, you make the product participatory. Is an exhibit participatory if no visitor sees a place for her own contribution? Tags: design participatory museum Pop quiz!

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Lessons in Participatory Design from SFMOMA's Exhibition on (you guessed) The Art of Participation

Museum 2.0

George is a stranger I met last week at SFMOMA’s new show, The Art of Participation:1950 to Now. The Art of Participation provides a retrospective on participatory art as well as presenting opportunities for visitors to engage in contemporary (“now”) works. As the museum's website puts it, "this exhibition examines how artists have engaged members of the public as essential collaborators in the art-making process." Here are two pictures. The first one is me.

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Arts 2.0: Examples of Arts Organizations Social Media Strategies

Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media

I'm prepping for a workshop on Social Media and wanted do a round up of recent compelling examples of arts organizations using social media strategies and tools. I've covered arts organizations and social media here and there over the past three years and last winter co-wrote a cover story article with Rebecca Krause-Hardie for ArtsReach. The art will be displayed in order of the average juried scores. They ask judges to self-define their art knowledge.

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Is it OK to Smash That? The Complications of Living Art Museums

Museum 2.0

I thought about all of this when reading about the recent incident at the Perez Art Museum Miami, where artist Maximo Carminero smashed a vase by Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei in an unauthorized act of visitor participation. While some in the art world are heralding Carminero''s act as expanding the role of art to disrupt and make political statements, I feel that this is a pretty straightforward issue of a criminal act. But art museums are coming back from the dead.

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Art Brings People Together: Measuring the Power of Social Bridging

Museum 2.0

We have some strategies for tackling this: convening diverse content advisors, incorporating anti-bias educational approaches in our design, developing participatory opportunities for visitors to connect past to present. inclusion Museum of Art and History research social bridging Unusual Projects and Influences Earlier this fall, I read this headline: "Stanford study: Participation in a cultural activity may reduce prejudice."

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Are the Arts Habit-Forming?

Museum 2.0

Imagine this situation: You go to an arts event, one of a type you rarely or never take part in. There's been a lot of innovation in arts programming in the last few years. Museums and other venues are offering special programs for teens, for hipsters, for people who want a more active or spiritual or participatory experience. But I'm interested in a more basic question: what does it take for a person--a visitor/audience member--to form an art or museum habit?

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A City and an Art Center Design the Future: Reflections on the Market Street Prototyping Festival

Museum 2.0

"The arts are future-making." I wrote this down when Deborah Cullinan said it at a meeting of arts leaders about a year ago. Deborah''s vision for the arts leading the way to stronger future inspired me. But I couldn''t fully imagine how a museum or an arts center could embody it. The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (which she directs) teamed up with the San Francisco Planning Department and the Knight Foundation to host the Market Street Prototyping Festival.

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Unassuming Superheroes Wanted: Join The Art of Relevance Advocacy Team

Museum 2.0

The result is a new book, The Art of Relevance , coming out in a few weeks. The Art of Relevance will launch live and in-person on July 12 at the Arts Marketing Association conference in Edinburgh, and you'll be able to order it online soon. My last book, The Participatory Museum , did well. I believe The Art of Relevance can go further. I'm seeking a team of volunteer advocates for The Art of Relevance. Book: The Art of Relevance

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Avoiding the Participatory Ghetto: Are Museums Evolving with their Innovative Web Strategies?

Museum 2.0

I’d never attended before and was impressed by many very smart, international people doing radical projects to make museum collections and experiences accessible and participatory online. Are participatory activities happening on the web because that is the best place for them? I'm afraid that the web is becoming a participatory ghetto rather than an integrated driver of innovation in museums. This fear was precipitated by a painful visit to the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

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Guest Post: Using Participation to Solve a Design Problem at the Carnegie Museum of Art

Museum 2.0

I'm thrilled to share this brilliant guest post by Marilyn Russell, Curator of Education at the Carnegie Museum of Art. In a straightforward way, Marilyn explains how her team developed a participatory project to improve engagement in a gallery with an awkward entry. We also wanted to: Inspire visitors to engage in active looking: notice, reflect, react, and respond to the works of art and to the interdisciplinary quality of the exhibition.

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Building a Pipeline to the Arts, World Cup Style

Museum 2.0

And it''s got me thinking about how we build energy and audience for the arts in this country. Barry Hessenius recently wrote a blog post questioning the theory that more art into the school day will increase and bolster future adult audiences for art experiences. Like Barry, I feel that more art in schools is always better. I also share Barry''s skepticism that there is a direct, premier line between art in schools and adult audiences for art.

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Guest Post: Weaving Community Collaborations into Permanent Installations at the Denver Art Museum

Museum 2.0

Earlier in 2013, I was amazed to visit one of the new “Studio” spaces at the Denver Art Museum. The DAM is one of several large art museums that is embracing making in a big way—first, through their event-based programming and open art studios tied to temporary exhibitions, and now, through a 1,200 square foot studio in which visitors can do art projects tied to the permanent collection. exhibition guestpost inclusion participatory museum

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