Earth Day 2010: Recycle

Tech Soup Blog

The only countries that have laws that set up electronic recycling collection and processing systems are South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, the 27 countries of the European Union, five provinces in Canada, and 20 states in the United States. There are just a few industrial electronics recycling companies in all of South America, Africa, and most of Asia.

Mr. Jim Goes to Washington (and New York, and Nairobi, and Seoul, and Kampala, and Boston…)

Beneblog: Technology Meets Society

law needs to change to comply with the treaty (the hope is that these changes are minimal). It was the third Africa Forum I’ve attended: I went to Accra, Ghana, in 2011 and South Africa in 2004. She is a University of Minnesota law school professor who was born in Africa and is a terrific advocate for the Treaty and its empowerment of the blind community. Like many other leaders of nonprofit organizations, I travel an unreasonable fraction of the time.

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Guam and the Consortium

Beneblog: Technology Meets Society

Japan is the biggest source of tourists for Guam, with growing numbers from other Asian nations like South Korea. education laws as part of receiving extensive funding. The final stop for my Micronesia trip was Guam, a U.S. territory. Arriving on Guam felt like coming back to the United States, although it's more like Hawaii than the mainland! Guam has a huge American military presence: the armed forces control about a third of the island. The presence is growing: the U.S.

Guam 100

Snapshot of Worldwide Electronics Recycling 2013

Tech Soup Blog

The WEEE Directive is the set of laws that governs the proper collection and disposal of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) in the 27 countries of the European Union. The latest update of the law is expected to be formally approved in 2014. The countries of Eastern Europe are largely on track to develop their WEEE Directive laws. has a patchwork of laws in half of the U.S.

Provide the Nonprofit Voice to America's Broadband Plan

NTEN

Consumers in South Korea and Japan can get broadband speeds reaching 1 Gigabit per second (Gbps) for less than the monthly price a U.S. Without effective deterrents, Internet providers will continue to discriminate against lawful content. Flickr Photo by Chi King The Federal Communications Commission is seeking public comment on how to draft America's national broadband plan. It's essential that they hear from us.