Open Source and the Promise of Sustainable Nutrition Security

Beneblog: Technology Meets Society

Jerry and I had a great conversation about open sourcing of agricultural scientific models, such as those used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in their climate change reports.

Open Source vs. Proprietary: CMS

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Content Management Systems are an essential part of the communications function of nonprofit organizations. There are a myriad of options, open source options are among the most popular, possibly the most popular. On the proprietary side, there are a number of options, and they fall into three categories: Single-source proprietary custom CMS (from one web shop, or web host). And there are open source options that can do much of the same work for much less money.

Trending Sources

6 Reasons Open Source Makes Sense

3rd Sector Labs

We talk a lot about Open Source technology (and we use it quite extensively too) so it might make sense for us to take a moment and explain why we are such advocates. Affordability – Open Source is free of licensing fees.

Open Source vs. Proprietary. Who won?

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

This epic battle between Open Source software (or Free software) and proprietary software is coming to a close. Speaking of Apple and FOSS, Apple’s OS X and iOS are based on the BSD operating system – another open source *NIX that has been around for a while. This is both made possible by open source software, and is completely proprietary. Open source software has won.

Open Source vs. Proprietary: Web Server Software

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

This includes databases, operating systems and other software that is involved in that process. On top of proprietary UNIX, people will generally run associated open source server software for web, database and development frameworks. On the open source side, Linux is by far the most popular, with BSD in second place. MySQL and PostgreSQL are the open source database systems most in use for web servers, with PostgreSQL being a pretty distant second to MySQL.

Open Source vs. Proprietary: Nonprofit CRM

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Because of this, the deck has always been stacked against open source tools in this arena. Both NTEN and Idealware are the best sources for information about the range of options for this toolset – that’s out of scope for this post. However, Salesforce in particular has a leg up that most other proprietary tools don’t have, because of their open APIs and their incredibly robust development platform.

Open Source vs. Proprietary: Graphics and Video

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

On the open source side, the projects that stand out are GIMP (a Photoshop replacement) and Inkscape (a vector graphics program – like Illustrator). I’ll leave it to the graphics professionals to say for sure, but they are both worth a look if you don’t want to plunk down hundreds of $ for Photoshop and Illustrator, and/or you like to work with open source tools. On the open source side, one program you must know about is VLC by VideoLAN.

Open Source for Nonprofits: Programs to Try (Part 2)

Tech Soup Blog

One of the best ways to gauge whether open source would work for your organization is to look at some actual examples. To read about how open-source software might benefit your nonprofit or public library, check out part one of this series.

The Hidden Cost of Open Source LMS

Gyrus

Open source learning management systems have become increasingly popular, and on paper they always sound good. The term free is usually a misnomer; there is almost always a cost associated with using open source LMSs.

Open Source Feminism?

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Open Source Feminism? She’s got some great video blogging, including a short one on “ open source feminism.&# Although women were only 25% of the Penguin Day attendees, that’s actually pretty darned good for open source related events.

Movable Type goes Open Source

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Movable Type goes Open Source December 13, 2007 This is old news, sort of. A ways back, Six Apart promised that it would open source MovableType , their flagship software product, and the software that underlies their TypePad service. They are really putting their money where their mouth is, in terms of working toward more openness.

Gender, Race and Open Source

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Gender, Race and Open Source June 29, 2007 My session on Free and Open Source software and the US Social Forum went great yesterday. There were a very wide range of people there, from folks who didn’t know a whole lot about open source, to those who were developing open source apps.

New leap for open source CMS vendor

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Mpower Open, the vendor who took their high-end CRM/DMS product, MPX , open source last year, has adopted a new name, Orange Leap. The combination of Orange Leap and The Guru are a web-based CRM/DMS and reporting system aimed squarely at Salesforce.com and Convio Common Ground. Orange Leap is possibly going for what is now often called the “ Open Core &# business model, although it’s not entirely clear.

Open Source for Nonprofits: What to Know (Part 1)

Tech Soup Blog

For this reason, nonprofits are good candidates for open-source software (OSS), which can offer the functionality they need, without the glitz, glamor, and high price point of commercial systems. Of course, many of these points are open to interpretation.

Declaring Open Source

AFP Blog

Declaring Open Source: "Declaring Open SourceA one-line patch to the U.S. Code would make open source software a charitable deductionBy John S. Code is the operating system of our system of government, the line-by-line instructions that govern our federal government. Irons, Carl MalamudFebruary 1, 2007The U.S. The code contains provisions for pretty much everything you can think of and lots of

How to find out about free and open source software

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Free and Open Source Tool #16: CiviCRM

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and Open Source Tool #16: CiviCRM April 21, 2008 In honor of the webinar that is happening in a couple of weeks, I figured I’d talk a bit about CiviCRM. CiviCRM is a nonprofit-focused open source tool, centered around membership, fundraising, events and such.

Open Source CRMs – people like them?

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Open Source CRMs – people like them? and although the sample sizes were small, and not representative of the nonprofit sector as a whole, the people surveyed seemed to like the open source tools available. There were 6 open source (or sort of open source) tools that showed up on this survey.

Free and Open Source tool #14: SugarCRM

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and Open Source tool #14: SugarCRM March 27, 2008 Since I’ve been covering CRMs for the webinar today, I figured I’d switch categories on my free and open source software list. Unlike CiviCRM, which is targeted to nonprofits, SugarCRM is a system targeted toward sales in for-profit companies.

Free and open source tool #1: Thunderbird

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #1: Thunderbird January 3, 2008 Before the holidays, I promised that I’d do 100 posts this year on free and open source tools. Generally, Thunderbird falls into the category of free and open source software that “just works.&#

The power of open source VOIP

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology The power of open source VOIP December 18, 2007 Today seems to be Asterisk day. Asterisk is the open source PBX application that works by using VOIP. I wrote a case study about it in the NOSI primer – it can allow for really great flexibility in building phone systems.

Free and open source tool #12: Miro

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #12: Miro February 26, 2008 Miro used to be called “Democracy Player&#.

So where is open source in the nptech ecosystem?

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology So where is open source in the nptech ecosystem? January 16, 2008 I’ve had a few interesting things happen lately which is making me wonder about what’s happening with open source, and the perceptions of open source in the nonprofit sector.

Free and open source tool #15: MPower Open CRM

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #15: MPower Open CRM April 14, 2008 I am so far behind, it’s not funny. My goal is to catch up by the end of this month, so that I’ll still be on track to make it to 100 free and open source tools by December. And, it’s got completely open APIs.

The “Open Source Software is Free” myth

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology The “Open Source Software is Free&# myth July 14, 2008 I had a startling realization a few days ago. No credible nonprofit technology open source advocate has ever suggested that open source software was free to implement. No one would think that anyone thought that implementing open source software was without cost.

Free and open source tool #10: Filezilla

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Is Open Source Right For Your Organization

Idealware

Lots of people seem to be talking about “open source” software these days, but for non-techies, it’s not always easy to find out more about this option. The term “open source” itself means that the actual source code written by programmers can be viewed, modified or downloaded by anyone, and the software is typically developed, marketed and distributed by a loosely organized community of individuals rather than a vendor. Types of Open Source Software.

Supported Open Source

Idealware

At this juncture where I have a sense of what it's like to work in a small org and am also looking at and helping larger orgs and foundations to make decisions about tech and use it in smart ways, I’m thinking a lot about something I call "supported open source." "How Should I go with a closed but well-supported system or should I venture out into the Badlands of Open Source?" That is supported open source.

Free and open source tool #3: Dokuwiki

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #3: Dokuwiki January 15, 2008 I have become a fan, nay, a devotee of DokuWiki. Dokuwiki is different in a number of ways, most primarily in that it is one of the wiki systems that stores things in files, not databases.

News in open source and open standards

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology News in open source and open standards April 3, 2008 Here’s a few interesting tidbits gleaned from the net: It appears that Microsoft’s bid to get Office Open XML, their new office standard did get through ISO. Venture capitalists are liking open source more and more.

Free and Open Source Tool #13: Flock

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and Open Source Tool #13: Flock March 9, 2008 I’m running behind, so I need to catch up in the next week or so. These posts on open source applications are so helpful.

Free and open source tool #9 : Pidgin

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #9 : Pidgin February 5, 2008 While I’m on the subject of chat, I figured I could talk about Pidgin. 1 trackback } Free and open source tool #9 : Pidgin - Affordable Web Developer - Just another WordPress weblog on Affordable open source web development.

Free and open source tool #8:XChat

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #8:XChat February 5, 2008 This is, really a post both about a tool ( XChat ) and about IRC (Internet Relay Chat.) It is a tool which is used predominantly in the open source world, for developers and users of open source projects to talk to one another, and get support.

Free and Open Source Tool #11: Azureus

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and Open Source Tool #11: Azureus February 15, 2008 Azureus (now called Azureus Vuze) is the best bittorrent client I have ever used.

Free and open source tool #2: Limesurvey

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #2: Limesurvey January 4, 2008 I am in the process of writing a survey for NOSI, which you will hear all about next week. Like many free and open source software tools, it leans toward the powerful, flexible side, rather than the slick, easy to use side.

Free and open source tool #5: WordPress

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #5: WordPress January 24, 2008 It seems like a good day to talk about WordPress. Here is yet another amazing free and open source tool getting a lot of good attention. It is another of those open source software applications that “just works.&#

Free and open source tool #7: Firefox

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #7: Firefox January 31, 2008 This almost feels like cheating, talking about Firefox. And, further, because it’s open source, there are some great spin-offs, that I’ll talk about later.

Open source your Open Social Apps?

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Open source your Open Social Apps? Which lead me to think about the idea of open sourcing OpenSocial apps. Can we build a library of OpenSocial applications that have open source licenses? at 2:42 am Hmmm, I am not sure that open source opensocial applicaions would matter so much.

Free and open source tool #4: GIMP

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #4: GIMP January 17, 2008 GIMP stands for Gnu Image Manipulation Program. I’ve come to depend on it, first because I couldn’t justify paying for a Photoshop upgrade when I moved to an Intel Mac. Now, it’s one of a very few choices that work on Linux – and it’s the best by far.

Why all (major) operating systems suck

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

I’ve been a user of a ton of operating systems over time. The only good news I can see is that the operating system is getting less and less relevant. Linux Open Source Operating Systems Technology Zen nptech opensource SoftwareIn the past ten years, I have been an everyday user of the big three, Windows, Mac OS, and Linux, for long stretches of time.

System 160

Free and open source tool #6: Joomla!

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Free and open source tool #6: Joomla! I’ll mention the other FOSS CMS systems in other posts. January 29, 2008 I don’t exactly know where the exclamation point came from, but if you want a scarily easy CMS to install, Joomla is a place to start.

Open Source Database solutions part I

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Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Open Source Database solutions part I January 1, 2007 I’m throwing up my hands. more on Open Standards and Benkler (actually, Benkler is up next – I’ve got two chapters to review). I’ve been using varied Unix-based databases since then (as well as others including Access and Filemaker Pro), and most have been open source.

Open Source Database solutions part I

Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology

Home About Me Subscribe Zen and the Art of Nonprofit Technology Thoughtful and sometimes snarky perspectives on nonprofit technology Open Source Database solutions part I January 1, 2007 I’m throwing up my hands. more on Open Standards and Benkler (actually, Benkler is up next – I’ve got two chapters to review). I’ve been using varied Unix-based databases since then (as well as others including Access and Filemaker Pro), and most have been open source.