Cool Mashup of GoogleMaps for Advocacy via Global s

Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media

Tunisian exile Sami Ben Gharbia is the creator of the Tunisian Prison Map -- an idea inspired by a New York Times interactive map charting murder locations. When you click on a place-mark on Gharbia's Google Maps mashup, a pop-up reveals details, stories and videos of prisoners and their families. I couldn't attend the Global s Summit this year in person, but did it via IRC ever so briefly. I'm kept up to date by traditional means too - like this Wired article.

Master Mashup: Viral Marketing from Bob Dylan

Museum 2.0

He or she has created one of the most innovative, enjoyable mashups out of a cultural icon. What's a mashup? One fun example is overplot , a mashup that takes quotes overheard in New York City ( the data ) and places them on a Google map (the tool), so you can browse the quotations by address. This mashup turns a simple list of quotes into a geographically browsable conversation. They're used to chart everything from crime statistics to Craigslist postings.

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Trending Sources

Trainer’s Notebook: Facilitating Brainstorming Sessions for Nonprofit Work

Beth Kanter

The ideas can be captured on a flip chart or participants can write them down on sticky notes and post them on a wall. Write them on a flip chart, white board, or slide so everyone can see it. Write the initial topic on a flip chart, whiteboard or slide where everyone can see it. Capture the questions on the white board or flip chart. Write your word on a sticky note and place it on the flip chart.

Replacing Mobile Advertising with Real-Time Data

Amy Sample Ward

First, overall: And when you click on “What does this chart mean?&# it actually tells you, with much richer context: I personally love data-map mashups and Qriously uses them brilliantly! Do you believe you can change the world? That’s the question I asked this morning on Qriously, a new application that measures public sentiment, in real time. It works by replacing ads with questions in smartphone and tablet apps.

Data 136

Ushahidi Develops Innovative Tools for Nonprofits and Others Working to Benefit the Public

Tech Soup Blog

It can inform members of a community of critical information as it happens, and tell an event's story visually with maps, interactive charts, and other visualizations. It can display data with maps, lists, charts, timelines, and other visual reports. We got to know Ushahidi's work when it entered our legendary third NetSquared Mashup Challenge in Santa Clara, California in May of 2008.

Map 51

Four Models for Active User Engagement, by Nina Simon

Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media

Online, this may mean participants creating their own mashups or using organizational data to construct visualizations. Here’s a chart that may help you figure out what type is best for your next project. While there are outlier innovative projects that defy categorization, this chart displays the fundamental characteristics of each model. . Source: Share Your Ideas. Note from Beth: I first encountered Nina Simon through her awesome blog back four or five years ago.

Model 88

NpTech Tag Summary: Penguin Day in New Orleans, Fondling the Tools, and More

Beth's Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media

Photo from LolNPtech.org (Registration is here ) Mashups, Meatballs, and New Orleans Do you look at all of the data available online, and imagine ways to combine and connect it to increase awareness about an issue? Then enter The Netsquared Mashup Challenge ! Via NTEN blog Google moves one step closer to making desktop applications obsolete with the release of the Google Chart API.

Data Portability for Good

NTEN

Over 1,500 mashups later, and a first prize win in the contest, DataMasher is proving to be a great experiment in data transparency. Honda: Online tools like DabbleDB or Google Spreadsheets also allow sharing data and even building simple charts or applications with them. You can create mashups like Carma.org by combining data sets or services. Michaela Hackner and Sandy Smith, Forum One Communications. For four weeks this summer, we got a crash course in data transparency.

Data 45

So, You Want to Host a Change the Web Event

Social Actions

Flip charts? Check out the Change the Web logo , slideshow , and posters , which you're welcome to use or mashup to promote your event. Social Actions' Change the Web Challenge is inspiring events around the globe - from Montreal, to Brazil, to London. Organizers like you are stepping up to bring together their community to explore using the web for social change and build new tools that help people make a difference online.

A Means to an End

Gavin's Digital Diner

Pie Charts are Fun. The successes, it seems, were many — increased public awareness, social networking sites, widgets and mashups, letters to Congress, web site visitors, etc, etc. The failure statistic is often cited, usually with a moan and a wail. It goes like this: 30, 40, or 50 percent of all IT projects go bad. The rest — the ones that actually succeed — well, they go “slightly bad too.&# At least some of them do. In the end, nobody’s happy.

A Means to an End

Gavin's Digital Diner

Pie Charts are Fun. The successes, it seems, were many — increased public awareness, social networking sites, widgets and mashups, letters to Congress, web site visitors, etc, etc. The failure statistic is often cited, usually with a moan and a wail. It goes like this: 30, 40, or 50 percent of all IT projects go bad. The rest — the ones that actually succeed — well, they go “slightly bad too.&# At least some of them do. In the end, nobody’s happy.

A Means to an End

Gavin's Digital Diner

Pie Charts are Fun. The successes, it seems, were many — increased public awareness, social networking sites, widgets and mashups, letters to Congress, web site visitors, etc, etc. The failure statistic is often cited, usually with a moan and a wail. It goes like this: 30, 40, or 50 percent of all IT projects go bad. The rest — the ones that actually succeed — well, they go “slightly bad too.&# At least some of them do. In the end, nobody’s happy.

Two ways to make your own Google map | Beaconfire Wire

Beaconfire Wire

This last feature let us build a cool mashup for the National Parks Conservation Association , resulting in a visualization of places where development threatens our national parks. And, of course, My Maps lacks the flexibility of the API; some very neat and involved mashups have been created with the Google Maps API, but if you want My Maps to, say, pull information from a database, you’re basically out of luck.

Map 40

A Means to an End

Gavin's Digital Diner

Pie Charts are Fun. The successes, it seems, were many — increased public awareness, social networking sites, widgets and mashups, letters to Congress, web site visitors, etc, etc. The failure statistic is often cited, usually with a moan and a wail. It goes like this: 30, 40, or 50 percent of all IT projects go bad. The rest — the ones that actually succeed — well, they go “slightly bad too.&# At least some of them do. In the end, nobody’s happy.

Advancing Your Mission With GIS Tools

NTEN

"Citizen journalists" throughout the country collaborated to collect information about this violence; they received incident reports from thousands of citizens via web and mobile phone, collated the data, and displayed it on a Google Maps mashup. Maps are a tool for visualizing data about place, much like charts are tools for visualizing numeric and financial data. Jim Craner , MapTogether.

Map 41

Advancing Your Mission With GIS Tools

NTEN

"Citizen journalists" throughout the country collaborated to collect information about this violence; they received incident reports from thousands of citizens via web and mobile phone, collated the data, and displayed it on a Google Maps mashup. Maps are a tool for visualizing data about place, much like charts are tools for visualizing numeric and financial data. Jim Craner, MapTogether.

Map 39